Business Sexy Advice column

This post follows last week’s blog on applying lessons from business to real life relationships. Tweet me @dds180 if you have any made up issues you would like me to address.

Dear Business Sexy,

I’m having trouble selecting the right man – or maybe I’m just struggling to attract the right man in the first place.

Have you got any advice for me?

Thanks,

Nicky T

Hi Nicky,

This happens far more often than you would think. The challenge is understanding whether there is a sufficient candidate pool where you are recruiting, whether you are skimping on the expected compensation package compared to market rate and whether you are making the most of the contact with the applicants you do have.

Usually it is a combination of the three – and employers mistakenly attempt to reduce the complexity of the problem by only addressing one.

So there are 3 key steps

i) benchmark candidate availability – speak to other individuals who are recruiting in the same areas and demographics and understand if they are facing the same challenges. If they are then simply try a different pub.

ii) check benefits vs market rate – in recent years benefits packages have been tailored more to shorter term incentives. This shift doesn’t represent the fact that employers are, in some sectors, still looking for an enduring partnership. Do some spot checking to ensure that candidates expectations of duration of the role are in line with yours – specifically do you have candidates interested in assuming a particular position temporarily when you are seeking a permanent appointment.

iii) check your candidate experience – so much is written about candidate experience these days – but people forget it isn’t about having a process, it is about a genuinely engaging experience. The best way to understand the quality of your offering is to engage a third party to speak to a recent candidate to get some unbiased feedback. This could yield some painful information, but it could also give you a greater insight into the strengths of your proposition that you can leverage in the future.

Hope this helps,

Dave

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